Weekly Go problems: Week 115

Here are the weekly Go problems for week 115.

Black plays first in all problems and all solutions are labeled ‘correct’. Have fun!

Easy Go problem

Sometimes when a stone is in atari, it’s even less useful than if it weren’t on the board at all. Try to reduce White’s eyespace as much as you can.

ggg easy 115 picture

Download the solutions to the easy problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Intermediate Go problem

The opponent’s vital point is your own. How can you remove your own weaknesses while creating some in White’s shape?

ggg intermediate 115 picture

Download the solutions to the intermediate problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Hard Go problem

Normally Black’s corner group would be dead, but as we’ve seen many times, a stone is never truly dead until it’s been removed from the board.

go problems 115 picture

Download the solutions to the hard problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Still want more Go problems?

You can find Go books packed full of life and death problems, tesuji problems and other valuable Go knowledge at the Go Game Shop.

Discuss other possible moves

If you have any questions or want to discuss any of these problems, please leave a comment below at any time. You can use the coordinates on the problem images to discuss a move or sequence of moves.

You can also download the solutions as a PDF or SGF file by clicking the links below each problem.

About David Ormerod

David likes teaching, learning, playing and writing about the game Go. He's taught hundreds of people to play Go, including many children at schools in Australia. In 2010 David was the Australian representative at the 31st World Amateur Go Championships. He's a 5 dan amateur Go player and is the editor of Go Game Guru. You can find David on Google+ and follow Go Game Guru on Facebook, Google+ or Twitter.

Comments

  1. Idk if it’s only me, but I can’t see problems in viewers :)

  2. Great set of problems!

    In the hard problem, when B3 is played in the main line, I think C3 should also be considered correct, though perhaps less stylish.

  3. Sorry I meant “if C2 is played” not “B3″

  4. Once you find the first move in the hard problem, it’s pretty straightforward. But I must say that first I tried the descent at G2.

    • Younggil An says:

      You’re right. The first move is the key point.
      In the actual game, it’s very hard to find, but if one practices a lot, he’ll have more chance to find a good move. :)

  5. David Hogarty says:

    Any chance you all will comment on the Crazy Stone – Yoda Norimoto match from the Densei-sen? SGF available here: http://webdocs.cs.ualberta.ca/~mmueller/fuego/2014-UEC.html

  6. Anonymous says:

    I wonder for the intermediate problem, why not Q5 directly ? *a guy who always plays R5 in his games* ^^

    • Well, what does playing q5 get you that r5 does not? You miss a forcing move, and they still are connecting in gote, expect there aren’t cutting points. Giving up one point and cutting points for no gain seems like only loss.

  7. Seems a good question. My take is that if Q5 then R5 is excellent shape. There is a slight gain for black in the centre but a point lost on the side and more if black is first to play in the corner with R2-S2-S3 (an often overlooked tesuji in amateur games), which is worth another couple of points.

    In the centre, if Q5 then R5 -P7 – R7 looks fairly natural – if black continues at Q8 tewari shows black has lost out. Of course he has the choice to reinforce with O9 instead, but I doubt that would normally compensate for the points lost. But there might be positions I suppose… interesting detail.

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks for the nice explanation Hippo. Q5 is also possible, but as Hippo mentioned, R5 is better for the future endgame.

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