Go Commentary: Cho Chikun vs Kobayashi Satoru – 4th Igo Masters Cup

This game is from the final of the 4th Igo Masters Cup, played between Cho Chikun 9p and Kobayashi Satoru 9p on July 12, 2014.

The Igo Masters Cup

Cho Chikun 9 dan and Kobayashi Satoru 9 dan (facing camera) at the 4th Igo Masters Cup. Photo: Inaba Yoshiko

Cho Chikun 9 dan and Kobayashi Satoru 9 dan (facing camera) at the 4th Igo Masters Cup. Photo: Inaba Yoshiko

The Igo Masters Cup is a tournament for veteran players over the age of 50.

There are preliminary matches, but former title holders don’t need to play in the preliminaries and can start in the main tournament.

Cho Chikun defeated Ishii Kunio 9p in the semifinal and Kobayashi Satoru defeated Kobayashi Koichi 9p.

Cho Chikun

Cho Chikun 9p won the 1st Igo Masters Cup by defeating Kobayashi Koichi 9p in 2011. However, Cho was defeated by O Meien 9p in the following year.

Kobayashi Satoru 9p won the 3rd Cup by defeating Ishii Kunio 9p, in 2013, and he reached the final again this year.

Cho Chikun was born in Korea, in 1956, and he became a pro at the age of 11.

He held the record as the youngest player to turn pro in Japan until Fujisawa Rina 2p became a pro at the age of 10, in 2010. Fujisawa Rina is the granddaughter of Fujisawa Shuko 9p.

Cho took his first major title (the Pro Best Ten) in 1975, and he’s won 72 major titles in his career. It’s a record in Japan, and the former record holder was Sakata Eio 9p.

Cho also won two international titles – the 4th Fujitsu Cup in 1991, and the 8th Samsung Cup in 2003.

In 2012, he achieved 1400 career wins, which was also a new record in Japan.

Cho’s style of play is very dynamic and passionate.

He used to play extreme territorial games when he was in his 30s, and it was very exciting and fun to watch his games against Takemiya Masaki 9p (whose cosmic style was the complete opposite).

That period was the heyday of Japanese Go and the players back then were very colorful, with contrasting and unique styles.

Cho Chikun 9 dan receives a certificate from Yamashiro Hiroshi 9 dan. Photo: Akira Adachi

Cho Chikun 9 dan receives a certificate from Yamashiro Hiroshi 9 dan. Photo: Akira Adachi

Kobayashi Satoru

Kobayashi Satoru 9 dan gives a post-game commentary. Photo: Akira Adachi

Kobayashi Satoru 9 dan gives a post-game commentary. Photo: Akira Adachi

Kobayashi Satoru was born in 1959, and he became a pro in 1974.

He won the 3rd IBM Cup in 1990, and it was his first major title.

He was in his prime from 1995~1997. In 1995, he won the 19th Kisei, the 29th Gosei and the 42nd NHK Cup, and he was ranked #1 in Japan that year.

In 1996, he won the 5th Ryusei and he was commended as the best player of the year. In 1997, he was in the final of two international tournaments.

He won 2nd place in the 8th Tongyang Securities Cup (he was defeated by Cho Hunhyun 9p), and he also came 2nd in the 2nd Samsung Cup (defeated by Lee Changho 9p).

In 2007, Kobayashi unsuccessfully challenged Yamashita Keigo in the 31st Kisei title match.

He also won the 3rd Igo Masters Cup in 2013 and it was the 10th title of his career.

Rules of the game

The time limit is 1 hour and 5 x 1 minute byo-yomi each and komi is 6.5 points. Let’s have a look at the game!

Commented game record

Cho Chikun vs Kobayashi Satoru

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

About Younggil An

Younggil is an 8 dan professional Go player with the Korean Baduk Association. He qualified as a professional in 1997 and won an award for winning 18 consecutive professional matches the following year. After completing compulsory military service, Younggil left Korea in 2008, to teach and promote the game Go overseas. Younggil now lives in Sydney, Australia, and is one of the founders of Go Game Guru. On Friday evenings, Younggil is usually at the Sydney Go Club, where he gives weekly lessons and plays simultaneous games.

You can follow Go Game Guru on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Youtube.

Comments

  1. HiddenId says:

    Welldone! the comment look really nice and easy to read with this new software. But I would suggest to also labeled who’s black and white

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks for your feedback Hiddenld.
      It’ll soon be upgraded. πŸ™‚

      • Josh Hoak says:

        > the comment look really nice and easy to read with this new software.

        Thanks! I’m the author of the software. We’re still trying to work out all the right features, but it’s definitely an improvement for mobile.

        > But I would suggest to also labeled who’s black and white

        Yes, that’s a good idea. There’s currently a bug for adding a title bar, and there’s already been some similar comments for this. That would go there. https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/7

        Thanks for the feedback!

  2. Thank-you for commenting on a game with some of the older generation players. Perhaps we’ll see some more in the future with Chinese and Korean players alike.

    White 26: It’s also usually worse for White to play this crosscut with the high stone of White 18 — Black’s ability to live in or threaten the corner increases substantially.

    Black 105: The kind of move you see in tesuji books, but almost never get a chance play in your games.

    Cho actually has over 80-titles, there’s a partial list here: http://senseis.xmp.net/?ChoChikun

    These diagrams would benefit from optional board coordinates so that users can effectively refer to specific points on the board.

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks a lot logan for your detailed comment.

      White 26: You’re right. Knight’s move is better with the crosscut. However, Black can still live with 3-3 even if White played with the knight’s move.

      Black 105: I agree with you. It’s really rare to get a chance in your games.

      Cho might have won over 80 titles, but some of them were minor tournaments, so they aren’t counted. Korea Baduk Association announced that this was Cho’s 73rd titles, but it could be wrong.

      Thanks for your feedback as well. This software is still an alpha version, and Josh will soon make it better. πŸ™‚

      • Josh Hoak says:

        > These diagrams would benefit from optional board coordinates so that users can effectively refer to specific points on the board.

        Thanks! That’s good feedback. I’ve filed this @ https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/31

      • White 26: Of course, but the conditions to do so are much narrower.

        Yes, the KBA is incorrect, because Cho also has much less than 73-major titles. Actually, the KBA stats for foreign players are often incorrect and have been that way for many years — but it’s not the primary job of the KBA to keep track of stats of players outside the KBA.

  3. Thanks for the analysis!

    Typos:

    Move 55 var 2: “Starting a ko fight with Black 1 doesn’t work, because there are no good ko threats for White” –> should be “for Black”

    130: 1 & A are reversed

  4. Hi i have a doubt which is the program that u used to make the kifu i really like it!

    Thanks for this review πŸ™‚

  5. Hi

    I have some doyubts too over the new format. Nothing that cannot be fixed, but…
    1) No move numbers and no co-ordinates makes it hard to talk about the game.
    2) I want to be able to go back to the last variation branch, rather than back one move all the way every time. Really importaant for these well commented games!
    3) The lack of board colour makes it a little harder to see the positions.
    4) I liked being able to switch to “play” to explore variations.

    Just need to add on this functionality which we are used to and like πŸ™‚

    On the plus side,
    1) the size is nice and
    2) the comments area is a good size (though I think the other program can be configured to have this somehow – I am sure I’ve seen it).

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks Hippo for your feedback.

      I’ll forward your comment to Josh, so he can reply to you. πŸ™‚

    • Josh Hoak says:

      > 1) No move numbers and no co-ordinates makes it hard to talk about the game.

      Definitely an oversight =). https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/31. One of my top priorities.

      > 2) I want to be able to go back to the last variation branch, rather than back one move all the way every time. Really importaant for these well commented games!

      Yes, I agree. This is also one of my top priorities and a blocker for launching site-wide. Instead of start-end, you’ll see Last Branch / Next Branch buttons. Stay tuned….

      > 3) The lack of board colour makes it a little harder to see the positions.

      Thanks for the feedback. We’re still trying to find the right theme =).

      > 4) I liked being able to switch to β€œplay” to explore variations.

      Filed as https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/32

  6. I’m liking the new Go player in general. My only complaint is that white stones are difficult to make out against white background – I think a tan background would make the difference easier to see.

  7. I don’t know why there are so many people said that Japanese pro games or Japanese reading stuffs are useless or out of date. But as I see, Japanese pro games are really classic and contemporary with full of interesting ideas in the opening and so many nice tesuji to turn game around which show good conceptual reading of Japanese pros. Also, it is easier to understand than Chinese or Korean pro games for amateur level because they put more emphasis on territory rather than fighting. But in the pro level, I don’t know it might be boring and too simple. By the way, I am a big fan of Iyama Yuta and Go Seigen lol… (without your commented games I won’t understand how strong they are)

    From W 34, black on L4 and then white on O7 (in the supporting variation) I think it’s ok for both because there is a cutting point on O6 but it’s boring hahaha.
    The way that Kobayashi left some aji and exploit the aji on the upper right of the board is very impressive but Cho Chikun played very solid and reverse the game. I love to review Cho’s games. His style very dynamic.

    Thanks for a good review. I am really appreciated and looking forward to the next review game.

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks Wai for your opinion.

      I think it’s because Japanese players lose more against Chinese and Korean players, but yes, their style of play is more classical.

      This game was quite nice and interesting to watch and you can see lots of nice tesuji in the game. πŸ™‚

  8. I’ve experienced a bug at moves 35 and 114 ; sometimes only 2 out of the respectively 4 and 3 paths appear.

  9. Thanks for the comments, Mr Younggil and congratulations for this new soft, very nice.

    • Younggil An says:

      Yes, I like this new software too. It’ll be even nicer when it’s fully set up. πŸ™‚

  10. Yudong-nick says:

    How about playing a ladder breaker at top left with Black 13?

    • Younggil An says:

      That’s a good idea to play in the top left as a ladder breaker. However, Black should come back to the lower right later anyway, and it’s actually tiring to keep an eye on the ladder. πŸ™‚

      In general, Black 13 or extending on the 2nd line instead is necessary for Black.

  11. Hi! As Kobayashi Koichi is mentioned: Are Kobayashi Satoru and Kobayashi Satoru related? According to Sensei’s library they are not brothers. Or is Kobayashi a common surname in Japan?

    Kind regards!

    • Younggil An says:

      Hi Markus.

      I don’t think they’re related. Koboyashi is a common surname in Japan I guess so. πŸ™‚

  12. Hi younggil.
    I do not like move 18 (white): after your alternative (correct) move for black 19, extending two spaces, black feels ahead. White’s extension on the left side is just asking for splitting, and white’s stones in the lower right look thin. Do you agree? I am probably vastly oversimplifying… but if you do, is 18 wrong or was it an earlier move in your judgement?

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks for your comment.

      White 18 looks still fine to me. Even though Black extended at the bottom, it doesn’t look bad for White and it would be another game.

      That variation would be better for Black than the actual game as you said, but I can’t say White 18 was a mistake, because the opening would still be playable for both.

      • OK, thanks; just a personal feeling then. It’s so difficult to judge the fuseki. I’ll have to think about it some more.

  13. Hi,
    I can no longer see the game. I tried with I.E and Firefox latest versions (Firefox with some blocking software – Ghostery prevented a redirect, but I disabled/whitelisted and can still see nothing).

  14. Wow. It’s back (on both platforms). Great service! πŸ™‚

  15. Hello Josh,

    This is a comment on the version of Glift used to display this game.

    A couple of the most noticeable comments: there’s no fast-forward or fast-rewind interface whereby I can return to, say, move 26 if I’m on move 100. I tend to view the board’s positions at different points like this quite often when reviewing games. I’m not sure if others do the same, but I found it somewhat frustrating.

    Also, conversely, once I’ve returned to move 26 by clicking the forward button 26 times, I now have to click it another 74 times to return to move 100 and continue playing through the game. πŸ˜‰

    I really like the KGS editor’s shift+click function by which one can navigate immediately back to when a move was played there.

    I agree with the comment about the buttons looking dated – that was perhaps the first thing I noticed.

    There’s also another slightly cumbersome aspect of navigating through lots of branches of moves (this is cumbersome in both Glift and the old GGG go software): If branch A, B, C, and D are all about 10 moves long, and I want to switch between move 8 of A and move 5 of B, I have to backtrack 13 moves.

    That’s far less of an annoyance than not being able to return to various points in the game easily/precisely, but it’s still noticeable, especially after clicking through lots of variations.

    Because of this, I really like move trees for navigation, like in CGoban 3 or MultiGo.

    Other than that, as a final comment, the last time I viewed this game on this page, Glift was displaying the comments in a wide open space to the right of the board. The board itself was also slightly bigger.

    My partner and I were both impressed with the extra space for comments and found the location (to the right) easier to refer to than at the bottom. The extra space meant pretty much no (or little) scrolling, and scrolling a significant amount through comments in a very small textbox at the bottom of the board was one of the large aesthetic and navigational problems with the previous GGG software.

    At this moment, Glift appears to have been modified to display comments which require this same cumbersome scrolling, and the go board has shrunk.

    Personally, I find this a large aesthetic step backwards.

    Xin

    P.S. I am not (much of) a programmer so don’t necessarily appreciate some of the finer points of your software. πŸ˜‰

  16. P.P.S. I didn’t say this explicitly above — one of the things I personally disliked about the previous GGG software was the board’s/stones’ tiny size. In general, I tend to find large board/stones in software a lot more pleasing and less eyestrain-causing after studying on it for awhile. To that end, the board shrinking is noticeably less nice.

    I’m not sure how others feel about this.

    (By the way, I’m running Chrome on Windows 8, with a 1366 x 768 display on a 16″ laptop in case this is just a me-specific display/resizing thing.)

    Oh, and I agree with logan that it is very nice to see games being played by older generations of professionals. I find that their play is very interesting and has noticeably different flavors from younger modern players. I don’t know how many older generation players are still active, but I’d love to see more recent games from them being reported. (e.g. Nie Weiping, Cho Hunhyun, Ma Xiaochun, Rin Kaiho, etc.)

  17. shizuka says:

    please make the board brown because the white stones on a white background are hard to see at times.

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks shizuka for your feedback.

      We’ve changed the color of the board, and I hope it’s better for the viewers. πŸ™‚

  18. “I hope you can feel these two great old players’ power and fighting spirits more clearly with this commentary.”

    being on the other side of 50 myself, i know i meet the criteria for inclusion in this group – yet i don’t feel myself particularly “old” per se… older, yes… by definition: older than 50. but the word “old” introduces certain connotations, as of decrepitude, senility, or infirmity, which are not necessarily accurate. perhaps others like myself therefore prefer the adjective “older” to describe us, rather than simply calling us “old.” thanks! πŸ™‚

    • just to be clear — the quotation using the phrase “old players’ power and fighting spirits” came from the downloaded .sgf commentary of this game… just in case you’re looking for it and can’t find what i’m talking about…..

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks Jerry for your opinion and feedback.

      Your explanation was very useful. I didn’t know about that, but I’ll use ‘older’ rather than ‘old’ in this sort of case later. πŸ™‚

  19. according to Kobayashi, white cut 68 was a hallucination, but the end result indeed not so bad anyway

    • Younggil An says:

      Oh I see.

      I doubted about that at first, but I was convinced myself that it was his plan after seeing his follow ups.

      Anyway, the result wasn’t bad, and the game seemed to be still ok for White after the hallucination. πŸ™‚