Go Commentary: Zhou Ruiyang vs Park Junghwan – 2nd MLily Cup

This game is from the 2nd MLily Cup, round of 16.
It was played by Zhou Ruiyang 9p and Park Junghwan 9p on August 30, 2015, in Guangzhou, China.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Park Junghwan

Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Park Junghwan has held the #1 more than two years in Korea.

He won the 19th LG Cup in February, 2015, by defeating Kim Jiseok 9p, and that was his second international title.

he probed that he’s ranked #1 in the world according to Dr Bai Taeil’s rating system, which is used by the Korean Baduk Association.

In June, 2015, he reached the final of the 27th Asian TV Cup, but he lost to Lee Sedol 9p.

His style of play is hard to describe. That’s because he plays very flexibly and his moves are well balanced between the power and skill. He’s not very good at attacking, and that seems to be his only weakness so far.

Zhou Ruiyang

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Zhou Ruiyang is currently ranked #5 in China.

He won the 1st Bailing Cup by defeating Chen Yaoye 9p in early 2013, and that was his first international title.

In 2014, he proceeded to the final of the 18th LG Cup to challenge for another title, but he lost to Tuo Jiaxi 9p.

In June, 2015, Zhou was in the final of the 10th Chunlan Cup, but he didn’t succeed to add another international title by losing against Gu Li 9p.

His style of play is practical and cool, and he’s very good at shape. However, he’s very weak against Park Junghwan, and he only won 1 out of 9 against Park before this game.

That’s very unbalanced between world champion players, and let’s see if Zhou has formed his secret strategy against his natural enemy in this game.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the beginning of their game.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the beginning of their game.

Commented game record

Zhou Ruiyang vs Park Junghwan

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

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About Younggil An

Younggil is an 8 dan professional Go player with the Korean Baduk Association. He qualified as a professional in 1997 and won an award for winning 18 consecutive professional matches the following year. After completing compulsory military service, Younggil left Korea in 2008, to teach and promote the game Go overseas. Younggil now lives in Sydney, Australia, and is one of the founders of Go Game Guru. On Friday evenings, Younggil is usually at the Sydney Go Club, where he gives weekly lessons and plays simultaneous games.

You can follow Go Game Guru on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Youtube.

Comments

  1. Very cool game , thank you Mr .An . Hope to see lee sedol become number 1 again soon ^^
    About 8 , i saw some games wher they played directly in 10 , what do you think about this ?

  2. Nice and 10x!

  3. Thanks for sharing commented go games, Younggil. Many thanks!!

  4. Very interesting game and commentary. I find myself skeptical of white 10. Has the other, slower alternative you mentioned actually been performing poorly, or is it simply out of fashion?
    It seems to me that after black’s successful invasion at 41, white is just behind. While you note that white 56 is bad, isn’t black better anyway? My keen amateur instinct tells me white had already lost his way by 56.

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks Mark for your question and opinion.

      The slower alternative is still fine, but that’s simply out of fashion very lately, so people might come back to the older style again soon.

      I couldn’t find any questionable moves from White up to 56, but it could still be possible that White was already behind. To me, the game seemed to be quite even, but everyone has different point of view.

  5. at move 71, variation 2, you note at move 76 that black was greedy and will lose his 4 stones. What if black goes o5 next and insists of cutting off white’s p6 stones?

    • Younggil An says:

      I see, you’re right Alan, that was my mistake.

      White 6 should be at O5, and that would still be alright for White.

  6. Thank you for the good commentary. I found the early middle game, with all those semi-connected stones, especially vexing. It almost looks like irresponsible amateur play. 🙂
    Having to back up such moves with analysis must be hard work for the pros.