Meet Glift: New software to help you improve at Go

 

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

About Me: Josh Hoak

My name is Josh Hoak and I am both a Go player and programmer. I live in Boulder, Colorado, and when I’m not programming or playing Go, I’m usually up in the mountains hiking or down in the city swing dancing.

For the past year, I’ve been working with Go Game Guru on various technical projects related to Go. Some are related to the Jubango, others are related to new study courses we’re developing, and still others are purely experimental explorations into ways to learn and practice Go.

Enter Glift

At the core of these projects is a new open-source Go player written in JavaScript, called Glift. It is pronounced either as ‘gee-lift’ or as one syllable like ‘glyph’, and it comes from the phrase, ‘go lightweight frontend’. It depends only on jQuery (and even that is going away soon), and uses pure HTML/CSS and SVG for rendering.

Glift started nearly four years ago, when I decided I was unsatisfied with the way problems were displayed on the web. Yearning for more dynamic lessons and interactive content, I started creating what has become Glift.

In particular, Glift was built to:

  • Be responsive. Mobile is growing explosively, so I wanted a viewer that could work well for both web and mobile.
  • Be clean and easily understandable. I wanted to display problems in a natural, book-like format, using cropping and paging. Call me old fashioned, but I love Go books! I wanted a web viewer that felt like doing problems from a book.
  • Be extensible. Whatever I built, I wanted to be able use it for many other web applications. Thus, Glift was built to support loading problems statically or dynamically from a server.

What’s Next?

Given this functionality, we will be switching to using Glift as the primary Go viewer at Go Game Guru in the very near future. Let us know what you think! If you find any bugs or have feature requests, feel free to report them at glift/issues or comment below. If you are a programmer looking to contribute, feel free to send your pull requests.

Also, be sure to check out:

And lastly, here is a lesson-prototype we made especially for Glift!

 

 

[Editor’s note: This article was written using Glift version 0.14.4. As Glift is updated, the comments below may not apply to the version you see here.]

About Josh Hoak

Josh is programmer and Go player. Josh first learned programming to generate Go books, and is now working to revolutionize the way we study Go.

You can follow Go Game Guru on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Youtube.

Comments

  1. Elliot Erickson says:

    This viewer is, in its simplicity, perfect. I’d be great with a bundle of commented games (such as the insightful game above)!

  2. I normally hate all embeded players, but this one has a nice feeling to it.
    It’s clean and responsive.
    I would suggest to set up the arrow keys differently:
    up-down for prev-next move, and left-right for prev-next variation.
    Because there is no variation tree, I would add a “back to last branch” button.
    Nice work. Thx and congrats.

    • Or just add up-down keys for prev-next variation. Without a visual tree that’s probably less confusing.

      • Josh Hoak says:

        I’m glad you like it, and thanks for the specific feedback.

        > I would add a “back to last branch” button.

        Yes, that’s a good idea and related to a current issue: glift/issues/4 (“Reset button for games with variations?”)

        > Or just add up-down keys for prev-next variation.

        For this to work, you’d have to know which variation you were selecting. But then, we should add this functionality anyway =). Filed as glift/issues/19

  3. It looks great, the only issue I ran into was there’s no “back one move” button in the problems, which makes it a chore to get through a multistep problem on a phone where it’s hard to tap the right place every time.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      > there’s no “back one move” button in the problems, which makes it a chore to get through a multistep problem

      Thanks for the feedback. Filed as glift/issues/17. Probably the biggest challenge will be handling the lack of icon real-estate. 6 icons is just about the maximum number of icons you get at the moment, and 2 of those are currently used for next-panel and previous-panel.

      > it’s hard to tap the right place every time

      Yes, I agree about this. For mobile, we’re considering adding guidelines like you see in many mobile apps to help with this. Filed as glift/issues/18

  4. An obligatory question: why is it not written in Go?

    • Josh Hoak says:

      I absolutely love Go, the language, aka Golang. Most of my non-javascript personal projects are written in Golang. However, since this is a client-side app, JavaScript made the most sense. Also, Golang didn’t exist when I started this project =).

      I have been writing the experimental stuff for GGG in Golang. For open sourced code, you can check out GoGlicko, a Glicko2 implementation: https://github.com/Kashomon/goglicko.

  5. (Copied from my reddit comment)

    Wow, this is much cleaner than the current embedded players. Very good. A few suggestions, though.

    1) In the first (game) example, I can’t imagine anybody wanting to jump all the way to the beginning or end. However, jumping to the previous or next variation or comment would be very useful. Maybe consider swapping out buttons?

    2) My second issue is probably more OS specific. On iOS, If I tap the “next” or “back” arrow too fast, it zooms instead of advancing twice.

    3) I also tried to click on a variation at the top of the board, and accidentally hit a site-navigation area, wiping out my progress (also reinforcing my desire for the next variation button). I am not generally fat fingered, so I am probably not alone. This is my main problem with the other web clients, too.

    4) I don’t find the problem interface intuitive, but will get used to it. I’d like the ability to back up one move when I play the wrong move. I’d also suggest moving the status indicator (correct, wrong, or blank) to the end.

    Again, great job. I enjoyed the Go Seigen-Kitani match (well half, until I accidentally navigated off) and the example problem was great, too. I am a little embarrassed that I didn’t know many of the best choices, so it was very useful.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks for the detailed feedback. Because you took the time to give thoughtful feedback, I’ll try to give a thoughtful response!

      > 1) In the first (game) example, I can’t imagine anybody wanting to jump all the way to the beginning or end. However, jumping to the previous or next variation or comment would be very useful. Maybe consider swapping out buttons?

      Yes, that’s very useful feedback. Given that this is designed to work on mobile, I’m always looking to optimize the buttons on the widget! I think this feedback is similar to this issue: https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/4, so I won’t file a new issue. The general gist is: how about a move-to-branch button and maybe also a change-branch button (https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/19)

      > 2) My second issue is probably more OS specific. On iOS, If I tap the “next” or “back” arrow too fast, it zooms instead of advancing twice.

      I can’t disable the zoom for iOS for Glift, but there are several optimizations we can make, like ‘key-repeating’ the next-move icon. In other words, you touch and hold, it should keep going to the next-move until you release. Here’s the issue: https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/24.

      Alternatively, we can disable zoom for iOS @ the page level on Go Game Guru

      > 3) I also tried to click on a variation at the top of the board, and accidentally hit a site-navigation area […]

      Yes, this is a tricky problem. I think we can make the experience of clicking on the intersections better with guidelines (https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/18). Might be hard to save state if you navigate elsewhere, though.

      > 4) I don’t find the problem interface intuitive, but will get used to it […]

      I’ve been using my app for so long, I have no idea whether it’s intuitive or not! There are a couple of things we can do to help. One will be to provide hover-tool-tips (https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/20). The problem interface is especially tricky. I’ve filed a new bug to consider improvements to it (https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/issues/25).

      • Windows Phone 8.1 has the same problem as iOS (it zooms in) when you tap the next move button too quickly. So the solution where you hold the button down to advance the game would be better than iOS-only page fixes.

      • Thanks, Josh. I appreciate your responsiveness. Remember that your app can’t be all things to all people. It’s strength is its simplicity. Improve what you can, but don’t let it become complicated or busy.

        Good luck and good job!

  6. It looks nice and clean, I like.
    For selecting variations I prefer what eidogo does. You can press 1 or 2 on the keyboard to select that variation. Pressing a, b, c also works when variations are labelled as such.

  7. First: congratulations on such an effort.

    Aside from a learning curve about the icons, what I believe is missing most is a way to go back to the previous move in “trial and error mode”. Now, when a trial is wrong, you can only move back by going into solution mode. And from there it is not possible to go back to reading mode except for starting all over again.

    Going back to the previous situation is not always possible. A “fast forward – fast backward” action is not always a null operation. A “back” operation sometimes jumps back to the original question but not to the in between section.

    Overall, the “back” operations at first sight seem inconsistent. I’ll play with it a little more to understand where it doesn’t do what I’m expecting it to do and why.

    Cheers

    Dieter

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks Dieter. I’m glad you like it.

      > Aside from a learning curve about the icons, what I believe is missing most is a way to go back to the previous move in “trial and error mode”.

      Thanks, that’s good feedback. I think there are a couple bugs related to this. 1.) Make tooltips for icons (issue 20) 2.) Make a back-one-move button for problems. (issue 17). I’ll probably just replace the ‘restart’ icon to a move-back icon.

  8. Looks fantastic guys!

    I also really like the look and feel of the black and white version. The commentary gets a lot of space too which is nice. Sometimes when I was playing out variations the board wouldn’t give me any feedback or advance to the next screen, I think that feedback is important.

    The lesson works really well also. My only feedback there are the icons at the bottom and the colors. It looks kind of dated.

    Great job!

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks for the feedback!

      >My only feedback there are the icons at the bottom and the colors. It looks kind of dated.

      Those will probably change somewhat in the near future. Stay tuned…

  9. Looks very promising, I particularly liked the clean and clutter-free feel of the game review tool. The controls of the lesson-prototype were a little confusing at first, they could perhaps do with a little tweaking.

  10. “I wanted a viewer that could work well for both web and mobile.”

    I’m sorry to say that on my Samsung GT-S5839i, running android v2.3.6, I see only white space where the goban should be, and the panel for the problem is incomplete, reading “Defending a Corner With Two Open Sides
    Black’s two stones have become”
    Telling me I have an old browser and directing me to a Russian language page wasn’t that useful either. Even the English language version didn’t really help as I’m tied in to my current browser

    I will be very disappointed if you replace the current player, which works fine for the problems despite not being very useful for game reviews due to difficulty in fitting everything on the screen.

    The Glift website is also unusable on my phone.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      > The Glift website is also unusable on my phone.

      That’s unfortunate, sorry. Have you tried mobile Chrome? Back when I was still running Gingerbread (2.3), I was pretty happy with the experience, and I think Glift should work with mobile Chrome, even for 2.3.

      If you don’t want to use Chrome and you can’t upgrade, there’s just not a great answer — SVG isn’t supported by the native Android browser for 2.3. But then, the mobile experience is pretty broken enough w/ just Eidogo — as you mention it’s impossible to use for game reviews.

      In any case, we will still have download links so that you can download the SGFs and play them with any SGF app installed on your phone.

  11. I tested the problem part briefly with my phone using touchscreen and here are my first impressions.

    First of all, thank you for developing this. It seems responsive and nice.

    Then some issues on my first try. Some repeat others, but I wrote them anyway so that you know they bother also others.

    – Lack of forward and backwards buttons, as restart seemed to be the only way when searching the correct moves.
    – Instruction text disappears when clicking just somewhere on the board. I did this accidentally and it confused me for a second. Maybe instructions could be shown always in a separate box, if there is space.
    – wrong/correct indicator is logically in wrong place. I thought it was a button and wondered what it does.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks for the feedback!

      > – Lack of forward and backwards buttons, as restart seemed to be the only way when searching the correct moves.

      This was to encourage people to read out the correct answer. However, it seems like people would really like a back-one button. That’s fair — I’ve filed a feature request for this at issues/17.

      > Instruction text disappears when clicking just somewhere on the board.

      That’s because the comments are tied to the SGF node.

      > – wrong/correct indicator is logically in wrong place. I thought it was a button and wondered what it does.

      That’s something that’s on my radar. I think the correctness ‘icon’ has confused quite a few people. See issues/25.

  12. This is simple and nice! And I like that it even provide wordpress plugin. Bravo! thanks Josh!

    I would love this simple plugin and JavaScript will work in any modern browser and operating system, be it desktop or mobile. I love this a lot!

  13. I am also seeing issues where I end up zoomed in on the buttons instead of viewing the board in iOS.

  14. could be good to get some hint on what those icons do and what their key shortcuts are. Mouseover tooltips?

  15. Anonymous says:

    In Portuguese we would say “encantador”. A very good frontend! Simple and perfect. And the most important thing: Whith the explanations the learning effect is a lot higher!

  16. lostbeef says:

    So GGG commentaries will be made up with Glift now?

  17. malcolm says:

    Given the unhappy experience reported above on Android 2.6 (http://gogameguru.com/meet-glift/#comment-9364) here’s my experience with a slightly more recent Android version (Xiaomi/Hongmi, Andoid 4.2, Chrome browser)

    The game record was easy to use and worked well. On my screen commentary area is quite small and there was some wasted screen space below below the control buttons. Could you perhaps put the buttons right below the board and the commentary below the buttons? It’s easier to scroll the whole screen up a bit to read long commentary than to scroll within the confines of the fixed-size commentary box.

    I had some trouble trying to work through the sample problem. Because of small screen/fat finger issues I wanted to pinch and zoom into the game board. This mostly resulted in a move being played where I touched the screen to pinch and zoom. I reset the problem while the screen was zoomed, then tried to drag the screen back to the top right of the board – same issue. The screen dragged OK but a when I lifted my finger a move was played at the point I had touched to drag the screen.

    I had no trouble using the gliftgo.com site, apart from the same issues with doing the problems, and I’m also happy to see a WordPress plugin – almost enough to start me blogging about go 🙂

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks for the feedback! We’re definitely going to get the zoom-issue resolved before we launch fully on GGG. Sizing is always a tricky issue — it’s constantly something that’s being improved upon. I think adding a full-screen option/button would really be nice for long commentary.

  18. Great job. In the second diagram the ‘left’, ‘reload’, ‘path’, ‘square’ and ‘right’ buttons have puzzling effects…

    Is there a button somewhere to download the SGF ?? I regard this functionality as very important.

  19. Very nice work. I’d love to have a playing mode enabled (2 players or against a computer). Is it on the features list or totally irrelevant? I could give a hand on this.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      It’s an orthogonal concern. However, it would be totally awesome if someone made a pure-javascript AI for Go with a standard API (e.g., GTP for Go — http://www.lysator.liu.se/~gunnar/gtp/). I don’t think such an AI currently exists, but I could be wrong.

      • Yeah, why not generating a JS version of Pachi or GnuGo (using asm.js for example)? One can try using Mozilla’s Emscripten project…

        • Josh Hoak says:

          I think that’s a good idea (and I really hope someone does it), it’s just out of scope of core Glift, since Glift is (mostly) a UI. If such a thing came about, I would definitely try to use it and Glift together.

  20. Here’s one more request that should be simple to do.
    When I replay a game, I really like an easter egg hunting function:
    When clicking where the next move is actually played, the game progresses one move.
    Otherwise nothing happens (no feedback on how close the miss was please)
    I find that this kind of active participation makes replaying games much more memorable.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      > When I replay a game, I really like an easter egg hunting function:

      For simplicity of the UI, I’m not sure if it should be part of the default game-viewer. However, I think it could totally make sense as a separate mode. Filed as glift/issues/28. Thanks.

  21. Can this program import game records into a searchable database like TheManyFacesOfGo?

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Unlikely. While SGFs are pretty small, the number of game records needed for a database is prohibitively large for us to transfer all of them to clients via a web browser. For example, the GoGod database is ~600mb zipped. That said, there’s no reason, with a bit of work, you couldn’t hook it up to a server API via ajax that had the SGF database.

  22. Nice. Clean easy interface.

    Tooltips would be nice. And/or a ? icon for a brief survey of all commands and their keyboard accelerators (please! I only found the left/right arrows). Otherwise no complaints, it looks to me a step forwards.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks! Definitely working on tool tips. More to come soon =). As for how to indicate keyboard shortcuts, maybe that should be part of the tooltip.

  23. Beautiful design!

  24. Some additional feedback (using Firefox with a desktop computer running Ubuntu). This probably concerns how the library’s used in your examples as much as the library itself, but I believe the two are tightly connected.

    — The cursor seems remains a “stone” even when no move is expected, e.g. when just diplaying a board position like on Glift’s homepage. More generally it’s not always clear whether the program expects a move or not.

    — “Trickmove lesson” demonstration : I really don’t understhand how the 3rd step works (“What are the normal ways black follows up this position?”). After I play the correct move, the board automatically changes (by the way I don’t like this feature, I think it threatens the interface simplicity) and I seem to reach an undefined state… I suppose I have to click on the “next” button at that point but it’s really not obvious. (edit: Oh, the second possible play was actually expected…). Overall, I’m not convinced by the dual-mode in its current form. At least in this type of lesson the “path” mode seems a lot like a “view solution” button. Thus one who discovers the lesson is bound to constantly navigate between the two modes and that’s neither intuitive nor practical. After viewing the solution, one should definitely be invited to continue to the next step, and not to come back to “what’s the right move?”.

    — “4-5 Openings” lesson: 2nd step. The phrase “How should White play in this opening?” may suggest that the viewer has to play somewhere before continuing. It’s still this problem regarding whether a move is expected and whether it’s time to switch to the next step.

    — “4-5 Openings” lesson: “Why does black let White capture a stone in a ladder?” step. Here it is possible to explore the variations without entering the “path” mode, and it’s much clearer. Obviously though, one can see the expected paths ; maybe a “view solution” toggle would bring a general solution ? [edit: Oh, after each first move, the next move isn’t indicated anymore ; one must switch to the “next” button and this is not intuitive, especially given that one doesn’t knows if the “next” button will actually do something…]

    — “4-5 Openings” lesson: “Can’t white just play the normal joseki?” step. It’s not obvious that one must play a stone/click “next move”. This same problem arises again in the following steps, though it’s clearer then that one mustn’t touch the goban.

    — “4-5 Openings” lesson: problems section. First, this section is a great addition, and it really shows the potential of the library to set up dynamic lessons ! But as someone mentioned above, a “one move back” button would be absolutely necessary. I don’t think the “go back to the beggining of the problem” button is that useful, so it could be subtituted. It’s clear that the “path” button is actually a “view solution” button in this context.

    Addendum: To illustrate my remarks further, let us consider the “What’s the correct way for Black to respond?” step in the lesson above. The path the reader expects to follow is 1. find or display the solution, 2. proceed to the next step. So the “next step” seems to be shown a bit early, given that one will be lost if he clicks on it (as he’ll jump to the “Now, let’s look at other moves…” step while he hasn’t seen the correct move yet). If one tries an incorrect answer, he should be invited to “go back one move” (all other buttons could diappear at that point ; again the “refresh/go back completly” button is perplexing and not that useful). And after a couple tries one will be looking for the “solution” and should be offered to (exploring the paths of the SGF isn’t intuitive for me).

    Overall, all of this is very promising, it’s great work, and other than the small tweaks mentioned above my main concern is that the “lesson” and “path” modes should be completly separated in order to make the default lesson structure more linear. The path mode is perfect for reviewing games but I don’t feel like it can be used along with the proposed “lesson” mode. Rather, it seems readily doable (and partly done) to implement some features of the path mode into the lesson mode itself.

    I hope this helps (let me know if it does ;))
    Tim

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks for the feedback! I appreciate that you took the time to go through the content on http://www.gliftgo.com.

      > The cursor seems remains a “stone” even when no move is expected,

      That’s a good point. Filed as glift/issues/30

      > […] Oh, after each first move, the next move isn’t indicated anymore ; one must switch to the “next” button and this is not intuitive

      It’s a tricky decision from a UI perspective. For Game-Reviews, people are perfectly comfortable with not always having the next move specified as a variation-number on the board, but it’s not quite as intuitive here.

      > “Trickmove lesson” demonstration : I really don’t understhand how the 3rd step works […]

      Yes, the multiple correct answer problem widget needs some UI work to make it more obvious what’s going on.

      > […] But as someone mentioned above, a “one move back” button would be absolutely necessary […]

      Working on it =). I’ll probably have something out this week.

      > The path mode is perfect for reviewing games but I don’t feel like it can be used along with the proposed “lesson” mode.

      I’ve come around to that conclusion also. Glift is very new and what it’s doing is pretty original (imo), so there’s definitely going to be a learning period to discover what works and what doesn’t =).

  25. Very nice work. Love the simplicity.

    Only have a few bits of feedback:
    1) I would prefer +10/-10 buttons rather than beginning/end. Happy to tap repeatedly to get to the end if I want to spoil the fun.
    2) Lots of requests for features here, some advanced. Please don’t lose the simplicity of it as you improve. There are more advanced tools with tree viewers, etc out there for really serious game reviews.
    3) Please don’t email me Go/Kitani games in a super-easy to use viewer in the middle of the day, I have work to do!!! 🙂

    Keep up the great work.

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks for the feedback!

      > 1.) I would prefer +10/-10 buttons rather than beginning/end.

      Yes, that seems to be one of the most common feature requests, so something’s definitely coming. Personally, I’m leaning towards a previous comment/branch button and a next comment/branch button. I’m currently prototyping some ideas that should appear on the site next week.

      > 2) Lots of requests for features here, some advanced. Please don’t lose the simplicity of it as you improve.

      Your point is well taken. Many have praised the simplicity of Glift, and it’s praise I won’t forget =). Even though software naturally tends to get more complicated, I think the structure of Glift is such that it’s on a good path.

      (1) Glift is designed for mobile, and so there’s a very low limit on how much can go in the UI before it becomes painful. I use my phone and tablet all the time, so I really feel the pain of badly design mobile apps.
      (2) Having orthogonal widgets (e.g., problem-solver, game-viewer) really simplifies things and means that if you need different functionality, you simply switch to a different widget.

      > 3) Please don’t email me Go/Kitani games in a super-easy to use viewer in the middle of the day, I have work to do!!! 🙂

      Haha. That’s all Younggil’s doing. His commentary is truly fantastic.

  26. I think this looks really solid! A few tweaks here and there would make it really great, IMHO.

    1) You’ve mentioned that the icons will be updated, and already filed an issue to use a back button rather that restart, but allow me to second both of those concerns.

    2) The correct move/incorrect move indicator is nice, except I’d think it could be more useful with a third state… An icon that would indicate something like “This is a commonly made incorrect move”, or “This is a move that comes later in the sequence,” or maybe even “You’re in the right area, but that’s the wrong move,” would add to its value, I believe.

    3) Also with the same correct-move indicator… I may be in the minority here, but as a fairly new/poor player, I think that it would be nice to be able to click that indicator to get a hint about what the next correct move is. That way it isn’t revealed/spoiled and I can still think about it, but it isn’t so overwhelming as some situations can be.

    4) Finally, the stone icons with markers on them — in the default board loaded state — are difficult to read and are boggling my eyes. You have white stones with black markings and black stones with white markings, and the markings are so large that they make the stone almost appear to be the color of the marking — which is obviously the opposite of the stone’s color. I hope that all makes sense. It’s just hard to see the board position at a glance when the markings are of opposite colors. Perhaps switching to red or blue for both stones would do?

    All of this is from the POV of the iPhone 5, for what that’s worth.

    Anyway, thanks for the work on this! I look forward to seeing it continue to evolve over time!

    • Josh Hoak says:

      Thanks for the feedback, Chris.

      > 2) The correct move/incorrect move indicator is nice, except I’d think it could be more useful with a third state… An icon that would indicate something like “This is a commonly made incorrect move”, or “This is a move that comes later in the sequence,”

      That’s definitely an interesting idea. I think I would prefer that to be a whole different widget, but it’s a feature that I’ve like on other UIs (e.g., GoSWF, GoBase). I can envision it being part of a separate mode dedicated to memorizing games. It’s not something I’m likely to get to soon, but I’ve filed an issue at issues/28 to keep track of the request.

      > 3.) Also with the same correct-move indicator… I may be in the minority here, but as a fairly new/poor player, I think that it would be nice to be able to click that indicator to get a hint about what the next correct move is. […]

      Personally, I would rather give as few hints on a problem as possible, to encourage reading =). However, it’s possible that this could be an option in the settings (see answer below).

      > 4.) […] the stone icons [..] are difficult to read and [..] Perhaps switching to red or blue for both stones would do?

      It’s very difficult to have a color scheme that everybody can agree on. Ideally, I think the answer is Glift should have a settings button. Then, you could set your favorite color scheme and every time you loaded Go Game Guru, it would have the color scheme you specified =). Filed as issues/29

  27. 1) With this, GGG wins first dibs on all of my future Go related purchases. If it’s available here, this is where I’ll get it.

    2) Blah blah blah things about the buttons… what I *really* want is an API to just tweak the UI as I see fit from within javascript. Something like a list of button widgets passed to glift.create and a way to define new buttons would be nice.

    3) The board itself is absolutely perfect, except it would be nice to be able to resize it from the browser. The KJD example particularly had me wondering how I could actually read the comments without having to scroll the tiny window despite having gobs of space available in the browser (I am not, nor will I ever, use it from a phone).

    • Apparently resizing is taken care of. I hadn’t tried changing the browser window’s size. Whether the site it’s embedded in will actually allow it to use all of the space available (which so far is none, but at least the examples can be made usable) is a different matter, but not one for glift to worry about.

      • Josh Hoak says:

        Thanks for the feedback!

        > 2.) what I *really* want is an API to just tweak the UI as I see fit from within javascript. Something like a list of button widgets passed to glift.create and a way to define new buttons would be nice.

        Oh, you can do that. It’s not very easy at the moment, but button actions are specified as part of the full options. See here: https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/blob/master/src/widgets/options/base_options.js. Beware, it’s not very user friendly — I’ve mostly been designing it to make it easier for me to use. You must also specify the relevant icon here: https://github.com/Kashomon/glift/blob/master/src/displays/icons/svg.js. Feel free to send me a pull request if you have some improvements you’d like =).

        > Apparently resizing is taken care of.

        Yes, but currently you must reload the page. We could make it auto-resizeable, but it’s not a top priority: I suspect that most people have one desired size for their browser window (this is especially true on mobile).

  28. Bui Hoang Duy says:

    Hi,

    This is a really nice work.

    In blogspot I’ve used eidogo with this code:

    And can you show me how to do with Gliftgo, thanks much!

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks for your question Bui.

      I think Glift is still on the way to upgrade, so you’d better wait more to use it properly.

      Thanks!

  29. Todd Bowlby says:

    Still loving the wordpress plugin. Thanks again: it’s great as it is, just a few suggestions come to mind from using it:

    It would be nice to have an indication of current move number.

    The config file gets deleted every update (not sure if that’s on purpose), meaning I have to change the defaults back after every update. (I have yet to change it from the last few updates, actually, so maybe it isn’t actually an issue any more?). Also a config file that doesn’t do anything would be nice, instead of a backup, so that it could just be edited in the wordpress plugin editor (which presently doesn’t allow new files to be made or renaming of files, so far as I can figure it out), instead of having to log into my web hosting provider and use a file manager (using WP, I rarely log into my hosting provider at all).

    • Hi Todd, and thanks! Yup definitely working on a current move indicator. It’s going to be part of the title bar (aka status bar).

      > The config file gets deleted every update (not sure if that’s on purpose), meaning I have to change the defaults back after every update.

      Hm. What defaults are you changing? Maybe we could provide some options for your use case.

    • David Ormerod says:

      Thanks Todd,

      Josh has added support for move numbers, and also full screen game viewing! Check it out 🙂

      The config file deletion isn’t on purpose. I didn’t realize when I first made the plugin that WP would blow the config file away even if that file wasn’t included in the default plugin files. However, it seems to delete the whole directory on plugin upgrade and start over. A config file is optional, by the way.

      I plan to add better support for configuration for WP admins soon, by using a settings page in the backend. That way of doing things makes things slightly slower (because the options are then stored in the database), but it’s probably the more user friendly, WP way of doing things. And then the settings won’t be lost on upgrade. I’ll do this as soon as I have enough time, but GGG keeps me busy already.

  30. I like the clean look and ease of use . The commentary is quite understandable . I use Puppy linux so I don’t have the usual operating sys up-fixes . My only problem is java.com has stopped giving out upgrade-fixes for linux tar.gz . (Unbunctu-debian) pkgs . I had trouble reloading because of it . I will not go back to MS. explorer . So please make it compatable with Puppy linux .
    I hope to improve my play as I have lanquished at kyu 10 and don’t seem to be improving .

  31. Hi,
    First: thanks for a great software, I love Glift.
    Now: I see there is a WordPress Plugin, great! However, I have built some websites with Drupal rather than WordPress. I’d love to get a Drupal module (for Drupal 7) to integrate Glift easily like already done for wordpress. Do you know of any initiative to bring Glift to Drupal? If not, I could perhaps help with this, I have some programming experience and have made simple things for Drupal before. I just don’t want to duplicate things if anyone else has already started with this.
    Best regards,
    Eskil

    • Hi Eskil,

      There’s no one working on a Drupal integration as far as I know. I’d love it if you worked on it! Let me know if you need any help on my (the Glift) side and if you have any questions about how it works. There’s lots of examples on http://www.gliftgo.com which should get you started.

      • Eskil Varenius says:

        Hi Josh – that was a quick answer! 🙂
        Right, I’ll try to get started on some Drupal integration. I created a placeholder at https://www.drupal.org/sandbox/varenius/2345991 which will eventually grow into a full module. If anyone else with Drupal interest wants to join forces, they are most welcome to contact me. I have not developed contributed modules before (only custom, i.e. local) so I have to get used to the Drupal project way of doing things. Looking forward to learn more about this, and thanks again for making Glift available!
        Best regards,
        Eskil

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