2015 Samsung Cup – Round of 16 and quarter final wrap up

The round of 16 and the quarter finals of the 2015 Samsung Cup took place on October 6 and 8, 2015. The venue was the very impressive Samsung Global Research and Development Center in Gyeonggi, Korea.

Samsung Global Research and Development Center, Gyeonggi, Korea

Samsung Global Research and Development Center, Gyeonggi, Korea

Lunch each day was freshly cooked to order!

Lunch is served at the 2015 Samsung Cup

Lunch is served at the 2015 Samsung Cup

It was a showdown between China and Korea, with Japanese, Taiwanese and American players eliminated in the group stage.

Round of 16

Shi Yue 9p and Kim Jiseok 9p were facing each other, and that was the most interesting match in the round of 16.

Kim has been in a long slump, and his haengma hasn’t been as sharp as before. Shi showed his strength, and he won the game relatively easily.

Yu Zhiying 5p was the only female player in the round of 16, but she was no match for Lee Sedol 9p.

Yu Zhiying dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2015 Samsung Cup

Yu Zhiying 5 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2015 Samsung Cup

Park Junghwan 9p, Ke Jie 9p and Byun Sangil 4p had little trouble defeating Zhou Hexi 5p, Na Hyun 6p and Gan Siyang 4p.

Zhang Tao 4p overcame Park Younghun 9p, which was most the unexpected result from the round of 16. Park’s been doing really well lately, but he lost in the endgame, which was very uncharacteristic of him.

Park Younghun 9 dan (left) lost unexpectedly to Zhang Tao 4 dan at the 2015 Samsung Cup.

Park Younghun 9 dan (left) lost unexpectedly to Zhang Tao 4 dan at the 2015 Samsung Cup.

Tang Weixing 9p conquered Lee Changho 9p and that was a meaningful win for him. Lee Changho was winning until the quite late in the endgame, where a few mistakes cost him the game. This would have never happened back when he was unbeatable.

The score became tied with China and Korea both entering the quarter finals with four players each.

Quarter finalists of the 2015 Samsung Cup, from left: Kim Dongho 4 dan, Shi Yue 9 dan, Ke Jie 9 dan, Byun Sangil 5 dan, Zhang Tao 4 dan, Lee Sedol 9 dan, Tang Weixing 9 dan and Park Junghwan 9 dan

Quarter finalists of the 2015 Samsung Cup, from left: Kim Dongho 4 dan, Shi Yue 9 dan, Ke Jie 9 dan, Byun Sangil 4 dan, Zhang Tao 4 dan, Lee Sedol 9 dan, Tang Weixing 9 dan and Park Junghwan 9 dan

Quarter finals

After a rest day, it was back to the Go board! Although not before some taking part in a yoga session to stretch out those tense muscles from the first day.

The best way to prepare for a Go match is...yoga?

The best way to prepare for a Go match is…yoga?

Kim Dongho 4 dan limbers up before his quarter final appearance at the 2015 Samsung Cup

Kim Dongho 4 dan limbers up before his quarter final appearance at the 2015 Samsung Cup

Kim Dongho 4p didn’t seem convinced this is a good way to prepare for his quarter final appearance against Shi Yue 9p which unfortunately, proved to be correct for Kim.

Zhang Tao 4p couldn’t manage to produce another upset which saw Lee Sedol 9p through to the semifinals.

Tang Weixing 9p and Ke Jie 9p snapped up the other two spots in the semifinals by defeating Park Junghwan 9p and Byun Sangil 4p, respectively.

Semifinal

When play resumes again in November, 2015, all of Korea’s hopes will be on Lee Sedol 9p who will face Ke Jie 9p.

The other semifinal will be an all-China affair with Tang Weixing 9p and Shi Yue 9p hoping to make it through to the final.

2015 Samsung Cup semifinalists, from left: Lee Sedol 9 dan, Ke Jie 9 dan, Tang Weixing 9 dan and Shi Yue 9 dan

2015 Samsung Cup semifinalists, from left: Lee Sedol 9 dan, Ke Jie 9 dan, Tang Weixing 9 dan and Shi Yue 9 dan

Game records

Tang Weixing (black) vs Lee Changho

Black 19 to 31 were lively, but White 40 and 42 were well balanced moves.

White 68 was the vital point, but the game was still even up to Black 81.

Black 91 was wrong timed probe, and White took the lead with 92.

White 118 to 122 were sophisticated, and White solidified his lead up to 146.

Black 157 to 161 were a good move order to catch up.

White 166 and 186 were small, and the game was getting closer.

White 214 was the losing move, and that should be at Black 231.

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Shi Yue (black) vs Kim Jiseok

Black 27 and 29 were practical.

White 32 was wrong direction, and the opening up to Black 37 was slightly better for Black.

Black 43 to 45 were light haengma, and the result up to Black 59 was favorable for Black.

Black 85 and 87 were brilliant, and White was in trouble.

White saved his group up to 110, but Black’s got strong everywhere, and it was good enough for Black.

Black 113 to 119 were gorgeous, and Black crystallized his lead.

White didn’t grasp any chances to catch up afterwards.

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Lee Sedol (black) vs Yu Zhiying

White 16 was warlike, and Black’s responses were cool up to 23.

Black 31 was premature, but White 32 to 36 were a bit heavy.

Black 45 to 49 were big, and White started to attack Black’s left side group from 50.

Black 57 and 59 were practical, and the result up to Black 69 was satisfactory for Black.

Black 73 to 83 were nice and strong, and Black was still in the lead.

Black 99 to 109 were magnificent, and Black’s moves afterwards were perfect to finish the game.

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Ke Jie (black) vs Byun Sangil

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Park Junghwan (black) vs Tang Weixing

 

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

About Younggil An

Younggil is an 8 dan professional Go player with the Korean Baduk Association. He qualified as a professional in 1997 and won an award for winning 18 consecutive professional matches the following year. After completing compulsory military service, Younggil left Korea in 2008, to teach and promote the game Go overseas. Younggil now lives in Sydney, Australia, and is one of the founders of Go Game Guru. On Friday evenings, Younggil is usually at the Sydney Go Club, where he gives weekly lessons and plays simultaneous games.

You can follow Go Game Guru on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Youtube.

Comments

  1. Move 99 in Lee Sedol’s game was very exciting!!

  2. Mr. Younggil An, thank you for the Samsung wrap up and the great on-spot short commentaries, as usual 🙂 I am very curious about the begining of the game of Park Junghwan vs Tang Weixing: is the fuseki till White 28 even? Is White ahead for good by White 62? If yes, what was Park Junghwan misreading in the prior sequnce?

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks for your kind note Lucian.

      The opening up to White 28 seems to be slightly favorable for White. Black 15 wasn’t a good choice in that opening I reckon. Black 29 to Black 37 helped White, and it looks like Park misread something over there.

      By White 62, the game was already good for White. Black 79 wasn’t sente, and the game became even worse for Black.

  3. It is so nice to see these kind of reports, thank you very much! I replayed the Ke – Byun game a few times, the first part is understandable to my very amateurish eye, but the second part, resulting in the final position, is quite a mystery to me. There are quite some unsettled groups, white, but also black. Black has more territory though, but at this stage that seems not that important to me. Thus, I don’t see why White resigned. Please, could you explain this? I would be grateful. Ke and his style of go seem superhuman to me, and I am really looking forward to the first clash with Lee Sedol: I feel it is difficult to predict the winner. Both played quite some short games at this tournament, is this a sign of something special?

    Kind regards,
    Paul

    • Younggil An says:

      Thanks for your detailed comment with some questions.

      Let me explain about the Ke vs Byun’s game first.

      When White resigned, the game was very difficult for White. If White eliminated the ko in the center, Black will block at P4, and White can’t fight properly, because the corner stones aren’t yet safe.

      In addition, after White winning the ko at 142, the group isn’t 100% alive if Black connects at L12 later.

      B8, F14 and J6 are all big endgame moves for Black, so there was nothing White can do in that situation, so Byun resigned.

      Lee and Ke both are very good form lately, and I think that’s a good sign for them defeating their opponents in early stage without any problem.

      I’m also looking for their first match. 🙂

      • Thank you, your explanation helped a lot! Like, noting these gote moves are all very one sided in favour of Black territory wise. I am always surprised how blind one can be, until someone tells you about it. Replaying games a few times helps, playing the games must be a disaster if you know this, all the uncertainty about what you might miss, it is like driving a car in the fog. But my guess is these top profesionals do not suffer much from it.

        Kind regards,
        Paul

        • Younggil An says:

          You’re welcome Paul.

          You’re right that these top pros wouldn’t suffer from uncertainty, but they’d suffer from many other things since that’s their profession.

          Losing games would be very stressful for some of them.

  4. Maybe older players like us only care about Lee Changho these days, esp. when lined-up against these other players. It was fun to see him get this far in an international competition, but surprising to see him lose in the endgame — something which would never happen in his glory days.

    • Younggil An says:

      Yes, I understand. I felt sorry to see Lee Changho losing his winning games at the end.

      He played a few sente exchanges for saving time in byo-yomi, but he still missed out several good chances to win, and I was sad to watch that.

  5. Hi. This Samsung Cup is full of interesting games. Thanks for the nice comments on the games.

    Tang vs Lee Changho, when watching, I wondered on move 80 if the reverse sente cut at G5 was as big as a move on the right. Or do you think Lee was treating the top and right as kind of miai?

    • Younggil An says:

      I’m not sure, but he might have thought the game was good enough with White 80, and the top and right side was miai as well as you said.

  6. In the Kim Jiseok game, you said 32 was wrong direction. Was white 32 better at L4? C9 and probing the upper right spring to mind too, though maybe the latter is too early?

    • Younggil An says:

      It’s hard for me to choose exact place, but White could come at P4 or N4 instead.

      Probing the upper right corner is also possible, but it’s not clear where to probe, because it’s a bit too early as you mentioned.

      • Anonymous says:

        Ah, P4 is very direct. The severity of modern go, eh? 🙂 I was just thinking of taking aim at P4/5 and Q5 from a distance. Interesting situation, and quite tricky, so thanks for the response.

        • Younggil An says:

          I’m not sure if that’s sort of modern Go or not.

          Yes, the situation was interesting, and it’s hard to find a good move for White 32 frankly.

  7. Roland USA says:

    My predications: most likely,
    Ke will win the Samsung cup: Ke 50% chance, Tang 30% chance.
    Lee will win M-Lily: Lee 50%, Ke 40% chance.
    Shi or Ke will win LG: Shi 35%, Ke 30%.